Sunday, December 17, 2017

Lots to do in the Alvo area - see the upcoming events below - none of these takes you out of Cass County - which is what Cass County Tourism likes (there's your acknowledgement for helping with this newsletter).

Announcement

bus ani 2

School is open - so watch out for the big yellow buses, both in town and in the country. There has already been one serious bus collision in eastern Nebreaska, the driver of the vehicle hitting the bus was killed. Keep your eyes open on our country roads and wear your seat belts and shoulder harnesses - Please! Buses from Waverly District 145 and Elmwood-Murdock schools travel Alvo streets to pick up and drop off students. REMINDER - If the red lights are flashing, come to a full stop until the lights are off, no matter what direction you are going. Also, both in the morning and mid afternoons during the week, groups of kids will be heading toward the pick up location or walking home from the drop-off location - Watch out for them, too.

Link to Lincoln Journal Star article

 Belated thanks to Douglas and Alex Barrier for cleaning and mowing the ditches on Main Street - THANKS!  man with lawnmower

If you're a night person, you enjoy the longer no - sun hours!

Date Sunrise Sunset Sun hours Days until Autumn
Wednesday, August 20, 2014 06:41 AM 08:16 PM 13:35 34
Thursday, August 21, 2014 06:42 AM 08:15 PM 13:33 33
Friday, August 22, 2014 06:43 AM 08:13 PM 13:30 32
Saturday, August 23, 2014 06:44 AM 08:12 PM 13:28 31
Sunday, August 24, 2014 06:44 AM 08:10 PM 13:26 30
Monday, August 25, 2014 06:45 AM 08:09 PM 13:24 29
Tuesday, August 26, 2014 06:46 AM 08:07 PM 13:21 28

 NewMoonCloseUp5 24 09 

New moon - 09:13 AM, August 25th - good night for zombies!

We are still abnormally dry!

20140812 NE cat

Link for more information

Historical Events for the coming week

August 20th

1741 - Danish navigator Vitus Jonas Bering discovered Alaska.
1866 - The National Labor Union in the US advocated an eight-hour workday.
1866 - It was formally declared by President Andrew Johnson that the American Civil War was over. The fighting had stopped months earlier.
1882 - Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture" debuted in Moscow.
1914 - German forces occupied Brussels, Belgium, during World War I.
1918 - The British opened its Western Front offensive during World War I.
940 - France fell to the Germans during World War II.
1953 - It was announced by the Soviet Union that they had detonated a hydrogen bomb.
1955 - Colonel Horace A. Hanes, a USAF pilot, flew to an altitude of 40,000 feet. Hanes reached a speed of 822.135 miles per hour in a Super Sabrejet.
1964 - A $1 billion anti-poverty measure was signed by President Lyndon Johnson.

1967 - The New York Times reported about a noise reduction system for album and tape recording developed by technicians R. and D.W. Dolby. Elektra Record's subsidiary, Checkmate Records became the first label to use the new Dolby process in its recordings.
1977 - Voyager 2 was launched by NASA. The spacecraft was carrying a 12 inch copper phonograph record containing greetings in dozens of languages, samples of music and sounds of nature.
1985 - The original Xerox 914 copier was presented to the Smithsonian Institute's Museum of American History. Chester Carlson was the man who invented the machine.
1998 - Canada's Supreme Court announced that Quebec could not secede without the federal government's consent.
1998 – US military forces attacked a terrorist camp in Afghanistan and a chemical plant in Sudan. Both targets were chosen for cruise missile strikes due to their connection with Osama bin Laden. - Turned out to be an aspirin plant - not WMD plant.

 August 21st

1680 - The Pueblo Indians drove the Spanish out and took possession of Santa Fe, NM.
1831 - Nat Turner, a former slave, led a violent insurrection in Virginia. He was later executed.
1841 - A patent for venetian blinds was issued to John Hampton.
1878 - The American Bar Association was formed by a group of lawyers, judges and law professors in Saratoga, NY.
1888 - The adding machine was patented by William Burroughs.
1912 - Arthur R. Eldred became the first American boy to become an Eagle Scout. It is the highest rank in the Boy Scouts of America.
1923 - In Kalamazoo, Michigan, an ordinance was passed forbidding dancers from gazing into the eyes of their partner.
1943 - Japan evacuated the Aleutian island of Kiaska. Kiaska had been the last North American foothold held by the Japanese.
1945 - President Truman ended the Lend-Lease program that had shipped about $50 billion in aid to America's Allies during World War II.
1959 – Hawaii became the 50th state.  President Eisenhower also issued the order for the 50 star flag.
1963 - In South Vietnam, martial law was declared. Army troops and police began to crack down on the Buddhist anti-government protesters.
1971 - Laura Baugh, at the age of 16, won the United States Women's Amateur Golf tournament. She was the youngest winner in the history of the tournament.
1984 - Victoria Roche, a reserve outfielder, became the first girl to ever compete in a Little League World Series game.
1996 - The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 was signed by President Clinton. The act made it easier to obtain and keep health insurance.
1997 - Hudson Foods Inc. closed a plant in Nebraska after it had recalled 25 million pounds of ground beef that was potentially contaminated with E. coli 01557:H7. It was the largest food recall in US history. - Go Big Red!
2002 - In Pakistan, President General Pervez Musharraf unilaterally amended the Pakistani constitution. He extended his term in office and granted himself powers that included the right to dissolve parliament. - I bet our governor would like to have that kind of power.

 August 22nd

1762 - Ann Franklin became the editor of the Mercury of Newport in Rhode Island. She was the first female editor of an American newspaper.
1770 - Australia was claimed under the British crown when Captain James Cook landed there.
1775 - The American colonies were proclaimed to be in open rebellion by England's King George III.
1846 – The US annexed New Mexico.
1865 - A patent for liquid soap was issued to William Sheppard.
1902 - In Hartford, CT, Theodore Roosevelt became the first president to ride in an automobile.
1906 - The Victor Talking Machine Company of Camden, NJ began to manufacture the Victrola. The hand-cranked unit, with horn cabinet, sold for $200.
1941 - Nazi troops reached the outskirts of Leningrad during World War II.
1950 - Althea Gibson became the first black tennis player to be accepted into a national competition.
1973 - Henry Kissinger was named Secretary of State by President Nixon. Kissinger won the Nobel Peace Prize in the same year.
- Now that was a travesty.
1984 - The last Volkswagen Rabbit rolled off the assembly line in New Stanton, PA.
1986 - Kerr-McGee Corp. agreed to pay the estate of Karen Silkwood $1.38 million to settle a 10-year-old nuclear contamination lawsuit.
1990 – President George H. W. Bush signed an order calling reservists for troop buildup in the Persian Gulf.
1992 - In Rostock, Germany, neo-Nazi violence broke out against foreigners.
1996 – President Clinton signed legislation that ended guaranteed cash payments to the poor and demanded work from recipients.
 

August 23rd

1838 - The first class graduated from Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley MA. It was one of the first colleges for women.
1902 - Fannie Merrit Farmer opened Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery, in Boston, MA.
1904 - Hard D. Weed patented the grip-tread tire chain for cars.
1939 - Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression treaty.
1944 - Marseilles was captured by Allied troops during World War II.
1947 - Margaret Truman, President Truman’s daughter, gave her first public performance as a singer. The event was at the Hollywood Bowl and had an audience of 15,000.
1959 - In the Peanuts comic strip, Sally debuted as an infant.
1962 - The first live TV program was relayed between the US and Europe via NASA’s Telstar satellite.

1979 - Soviet dancer Alexander Godunov defected while the Bolshoi Ballet was on tour in New York City.
1987 - Robert Jarvik and Marilyn Mach vos Savant were married. The event was called the "Union of Great Minds" since Savant had an IQ of 228 and Jarvik was the inventor of the artificial heart.
1990 - Saddam Hussein appeared on Iraqi state television with a group of Western detainees that he referred to as "guests." He told the group that they were being held "to prevent the scourge of war."
1996 - President Clinton imposed limits on peddling cigarettes to children.

August 24th

 0079 - Mount Vesuvius erupted, killing approximately 20,000 people. The cities of Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum were buried in volcanic ash.
0410 - The Visigoths overran Rome. This event symbolized the fall of the Western Roman Empire.
1572 - The Catholics began their St. Bartholome's Day slaughter of about 70,000 French Protestants in Paris.- God and Pope Gregory XII said it was OK

 1814 - Washington, DC was invaded by British forces that set fire to the White House and Capitol.
1869 - A patent for the waffle iron was received by Cornelius Swarthout.
1932 - Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the US non-stop. The trip from Los Angeles, CA to Newark, NJ took about 19 hours.
1959 - Three days after Hawaiian statehood, Hiram L. Fong was sworn in as the first Chinese-American US senator along with Oren Long, while Daniel K. Inouye was sworn in as the first Japanese-American US representative.

1986 - Frontier Airlines shut down. Thousands of people were left stranded.
1995 - Microsoft's "Windows 95" went on sale.
1998 - A donation of 24 beads was made, from three parties, to the Indian Museum of North America at the Crazy Horse Memorial. The beads are said to be those that were used in 1626 to buy Manhattan from the Indians.

animated us half mast flag1

2001 - The remains of nine American servicemen killed in the Korean War were returned to the U.S. The bodies were found about 60 miles north of Pyongyang. It was estimated that it would be a year before the identities of the soldiers would be known.
2001 - District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly was randomly picked to take over the Microsoft monopoly case. She would decide how Microsoft should be punished for illegally trying to squelch its competitors.
2001 - NASA announced that operation of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite would end by September 30th due to budget restrictions. Though the satellite is best known for monitoring a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, it was designed to provide information about the upper atmosphere by measuring its winds, temperatures, chemistry and energy received from the sun.
- Funny that happened when Global Warming became a topic of discussion.
2005 - The planet Pluto was reclassified as a "dwarf planet" by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Pluto's status was changed due to the IAU's new rules for an object qualifying as a planet. Pluto met two of the three rules because it orbits the sun and is large enough to assume a nearly round shape. However, since Pluto has an oblong orbit and overlaps the orbit of Neptune it disqualified Pluto as a planet. - Nothing like changing the rules just because you can.

August 25th

1718 - Hundreds of colonists from France arrived in Louisiana. Some settled in present-day New Orleans.
1814 - The Library of Congress was destroyed by British forces.
1916 - The National Park Service was established as part of the Department of the Interior.
1920 - Ethelda Bleibtrey won the 100-meter freestyle swimming competition in Antwerp, Belgium. She was the first woman to win an Olympic competition for the US.

1941 – President Franklin Roosevelt signed the bill appropriating funds for construction of the Pentagon.
1944 - Paris, France, was liberated by Allied forces ending four years of German occupation.
1950 – President Truman ordered the seizure of US railroads to avert a strike.
1972 - In Great Britain, computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan was introduced.
1983 - The U.S. and the Soviet Union signed a $10 billion grain pact.
1992 - It was reported by researchers that cigarette smoking significantly increased the risk of developing cataracts.
1997 - The tobacco industry agreed to an $11.3 billion settlement with the state of Florida. - Republicans callled for a tax cut.
1998 - A survey released said that 1/3 of Americans use the Internet.

August 26th

1842 - The first fiscal year was established by Congress to start on July 1st.
1873 - The school board of St. Louis, MO authorized the first public kindergarten.
1920 - The 19th amendment to the US Constitution was certified by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby. The amendment prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in the voting booth.
1945 - The Japanese were given surrender instructions on the battleship USS Missouri at the end of World War II.
1957 - The first Edsel made by the Ford Motor Company rolled of the assembly line. - Not one of Ford's better ideas
1973 - A U.S. Presidential Proclamation was declared that made August 26th Women's Equality Day.
1987 - The Fuller Brush Company announced plans to open two retail stores in Dallas, TX. The company had sold its products door to door for 81 years.
1998 – The US government announced investigation of Microsoft in an attempt to discover if they "bullied" Intel into delaying new technology.

  “Be the change that you wish to see in the world.” - Mahatma Ghandi

 “Two things are infinite: the universe and human stupidity; and I'm not sure about the universe.” - Albert Einstein

 "The earth is the mother of all people, and all people should have equal rights upon it." - Chief Joseph

"It's just better to promote love and fairness and equality than it is to promote something you think is based on your religious beliefs." - Jane Weidlin

"Women will only have true equality when men share with them the responsibility of bringing up the next generation." - Ruth Bader Ginsburg

1 - Danish navigator Vitus Jonas Bering discovered Alaska.
1866 - The National Labor Union in the US advocated an eight-hour workday.
1866 - It was formally declared by President Andrew Johnson that the American Civil War was over. The fighting had stopped months earlier.
1882 - Tchaikovsky's "1812 Overture" debuted in Moscow.
1914 - German forces occupied Brussels, Belgium, during World War I.
1918 - The British opened its Western Front offensive during World War I.
1923 - The first American dirigible, the "Shenandoah," was launched in Lakehurst, NJ. The ship began its maiden voyage from the same location on September 4.
1940 - France fell to the Germans during World War II.
1953 - It was announced by the Soviet Union that they had detonated a hydrogen bomb.
1955 - Colonel Horace A. Hanes, a USAF pilot, flew to an altitude of 40,000 feet. Hanes reached a speed of 822.135 miles per hour in a Super Sabrejet.
1964 - A $1 billion anti-poverty measure was signed by President Lyndon Johnson.

1967 - The New York Times reported about a noise reduction system for album and tape recording developed by technicians R. and D.W. Dolby. Elektra Record's subsidiary, Checkmate Records became the first label to use the new Dolby process in its recordings.
1977 - Voyager 2 was launched by NASA. The spacecraft was carrying a 12 inch copper phonograph record containing greetings in dozens of languages, samples of music and sounds of nature.
1985 - The original Xerox 914 copier was presented to the Smithsonian Institute's Museum of American History. Chester Carlson was the man who invented the machine.
1998 - Canada's Supreme Court announced that Quebec could not secede without the federal government's consent.
1998 – US military forces attacked a terrorist camp in Afghanistan and a chemical plant in Sudan. Both targets were chosen for cruise missile strikes due to their connection with Osama bin Laden.
1998 - The U.N. Security Council extended trade sanctions against Iraq for blocking arms inspections.

 

August 21st

1680 - The Pueblo Indians drove the Spanish out and took possession of Santa Fe, NM.
1831 - Nat Turner, a former slave, led a violent insurrection in Virginia. He was later executed.
1841 - A patent for venetian blinds was issued to John Hampton.
1878 - The American Bar Association was formed by a group of lawyers, judges and law professors in Saratoga, NY.
1888 - The adding machine was patented by William Burroughs.
1912 - Arthur R. Eldred became the first American boy to become an Eagle Scout. It is the highest rank in the Boy Scouts of America.
1923 - In Kalamazoo, Michigan, an ordinance was passed forbidding dancers from gazing into the eyes of their partner.
1943 - Japan evacuated the Aleutian island of Kiaska. Kiaska had been the last North American foothold held by the Japanese.
1945 - President Truman ended the Lend-Lease program that had shipped about $50 billion in aid to America's Allies during World War II.
1959 – Hawaii became the 50th state.  President Eisenhower also issued the order for the 50 star flag.
1963 - In South Vietnam, martial law was declared. Army troops and police began to crack down on the Buddhist anti-government protesters.
1971 - Laura Baugh, at the age of 16, won the United States Women's Amateur Golf tournament. She was the youngest winner in the history of the tournament.
1984 - Victoria Roche, a reserve outfielder, became the first girl to ever compete in a Little League World Series game.
1996 - The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 was signed by President Clinton. The act made it easier to obtain and keep health insurance.
1997 - Hudson Foods Inc. closed a plant in Nebraska after it had recalled 25 million pounds of ground beef that was potentially contaminated with E. coli 01557:H7. It was the largest food recall in US history.
2002 - In Pakistan, President General Pervez Musharraf unilaterally amended the Pakistani constitution. He extended his term in office and granted himself powers that included the right to dissolve parliament.

 

August 22nd

1762 - Ann Franklin became the editor of the Mercury of Newport in Rhode Island. She was the first female editor of an American newspaper.
1770 - Australia was claimed under the British crown when Captain James Cook landed there.
1775 - The American colonies were proclaimed to be in a state of open rebellion by England's King George III.
1846 – The US annexed New Mexico.
1865 - A patent for liquid soap was issued to William Sheppard.
1902 - In Hartford, CT, Theodore Roosevelt became the first president to ride in an automobile.
1906 - The Victor Talking Machine Company of Camden, NJ began to manufacture the Victrola. The hand-cranked unit, with horn cabinet, sold for $200.
1941 - Nazi troops reached the outskirts of Leningrad during World War II.
1950 - Althea Gibson became the first black tennis player to be accepted into a national competition.
1973 - Henry Kissinger was named Secretary of State by President Nixon. Kissinger won the Nobel Peace Prize in the same year.
1984 - The last Volkswagen Rabbit rolled off the assembly line in New Stanton, PA.
1986 - Kerr-McGee Corp. agreed to pay the estate of Karen Silkwood $1.38 million to settle a 10-year-old nuclear contamination lawsuit.
1990 – President George H. W. Bush signed an order calling reservists for buildup of troops in the Persian Gulf.
1990 – The State Department announced that the Embassy in Kuwait would not be closed under President Saddam Hussein's demand.
1992 - In Rostock, Germany, neo-Nazi violence broke out against foreigners.
1996 – President Clinton signed legislation that ended guaranteed cash payments to the poor and demanded work from recipients.

August 23rd

1838 - The first class graduated from Mount Holyoke Female Seminary in South Hadley MA. It was one of the first colleges for women.
1902 - Fannie Merrit Farmer opened Miss Farmer’s School of Cookery, in Boston, MA.
1904 - Hard D. Weed patented the grip-tread tire chain for cars.
1939 - Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union signed a non-aggression treaty.
1944 - During World War II, Romanian prime minister Ion Antonescue was dismissed. Soon after the country would abandon the Axis and join the Allies.
1944 - Marseilles was captured by Allied troops during World War II.
1947 - Margaret Truman, President Truman’s daughter, gave her first public performance as a singer. The event was at the Hollywood Bowl and had an audience of 15,000.
1959 - In the Peanuts comic strip, Sally debuted as an infant.
1962 - The first live TV program was relayed between the US and Europe via NASA’s Telstar satellite.
1979 - Soviet dancer Alexander Godunov defected while the Bolshoi Ballet was on tour in New York City.
1987 - Robert Jarvik and Marilyn Mach vos Savant were married. The event was called the "Union of Great Minds" since Savant had an IQ of 228 and Jarvik was the inventor of the artificial heart.
1990 - Saddam Hussein appeared on Iraqi state television with a group of Western detainees that he referred to as "guests." He told the group that they were being held "to prevent the scourge of war."
1993 - It was confirmed by Los Angeles police that Michael Jackson was the subject of a criminal investigation.
1996 - President Clinton imposed limits on peddling cigarettes to children.

 

August 24th

0079 - Mount Vesuvius erupted, killing approximately 20,000 people. The cities of Pompeii, Stabiae and Herculaneum were buried in volcanic ash.
0410 - The Visigoths overran Rome. This event symbolized the fall of the Western Roman Empire.
1572 - The Catholics began their slaughter of about 70,000 French Protestants in Paris.

1814 - Washington, DC was invaded by British forces that set fire to the White House and Capitol.
1869 - A patent for the waffle iron was received by Cornelius Swarthout.
1932 - Amelia Earhart became the first woman to fly across the US non-stop. The trip from Los Angeles, CA to Newark, NJ took about 19 hours.
1959 - Three days after Hawaiian statehood, Hiram L. Fong was sworn in as the first Chinese-American US senator along with Oren Long, while Daniel K. Inouye was sworn in as the first Japanese-American US representative.

1986 - Frontier Airlines shut down. Thousands of people were left stranded.
1995 - Microsoft's "Windows 95" went on sale.
1998 - A donation of 24 beads was made, from three parties, to the Indian Museum of North America at the Crazy Horse Memorial. The beads are said to be those that were used in 1626 to buy Manhattan from the Indians.
2001 - The remains of nine American servicemen killed in the Korean War were returned to the U.S. The bodies were found about 60 miles north of Pyongyang. It was estimated that it would be a year before the identities of the soldiers would be known.
2001 - District Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly was randomly picked to take over the Microsoft monopoly case. She would decide how Microsoft should be punished for illegally trying to squelch its competitors.
2001 - NASA announced that operation of the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite would end by September 30th due to budget restrictions. Though the satellite is best known for monitoring a hole in the ozone layer over Antarctica, it was designed to provide information about the upper atmosphere by measuring its winds, temperatures, chemistry and energy received from the sun.
2005 - The planet Pluto was reclassified as a "dwarf planet" by the International Astronomical Union (IAU). Pluto's status was changed due to the IAU's new rules for an object qualifying as a planet. Pluto met two of the three rules because it orbits the sun and is large enough to assume a nearly round shape. However, since Pluto has an oblong orbit and overlaps the orbit of Neptune it disqualified Pluto as a planet.

August 25th

1718 - Hundreds of colonists from France arrived in Louisiana. Some settled in present-day New Orleans.
1814 - The Library of Congress was destroyed by British forces.
1916 - The National Park Service was established as part of the Department of the Interior.
1920 - Ethelda Bleibtrey won the 100-meter freestyle swimming competition in Antwerp, Belgium. She was the first woman to win an Olympic competition for the US.

1941 – President Franklin Roosevelt signed the bill appropriating funds for construction of the Pentagon.
1944 - Paris, France, was liberated by Allied forces ending four years of German occupation.
1950 – President Truman ordered the seizure of US railroads to avert a strike.
1972 - In Great Britain, computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan was introduced.
1983 - The U.S. and the Soviet Union signed a $10 billion grain pact.
1992 - It was reported by researchers that cigarette smoking significantly increased the risk of developing cataracts.
1997 - The tobacco industry agreed to an $11.3 billion settlement with the state of Florida.
1998 - A survey released said that 1/3 of Americans use the Internet.

 

August 26th

1842 - The first fiscal year was established by Congress to start on July 1st.
1873 - The school board of St. Louis, MO authorized the first public kindergarten.
1920 - The 19th amendment to the US Constitution was certified by Secretary of State Bainbridge Colby. The amendment prohibited discrimination on the basis of sex in the voting booth.
1934 - Adolf Hitler demanded that France turn over their Saar region to Germany.
1945 - The Japanese were given surrender instructions on the battleship USS Missouri at the end of World War II.
1957 - The first Edsel made by the Ford Motor Company rolled of the assembly line.
1973 - A U.S. Presidential Proclamation was declared that made August 26th Women's Equality Day.
1987 - The Fuller Brush Company announced plans to open two retail stores in Dallas, TX. The company had sold its products door to door for 81 years.
1998 – The US government announced investigation of Microsoft in an attempt to discover if they "bullied" Intel into delaying new technology.

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